U.S. nonfuel mineral production increased for the third consecutive year in 2012, up $1.7 billion over the previous year, according to Mineral Commodity Summaries 2013, a comprehensive annual report by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The study by the USGS National Minerals Information Center is the world’s earliest available source of 2012’s mineral production statistics. With data on 90 mineral commodities key to the U.S. economy, it addresses events, trends and issues impacting the domestic and global minerals industries.

The report reflects unconventional realities, too, added USGS Director Marcia McNutt, wherein “geology meets economics to create the complex tapestry of variations in mineral production over time and space.” Raw value from U.S. mine output last year was $76.5 billion the report noted—a modest increase from 2011’s $74.8 billion. Net mineral raw materials and old scrap exports, meanwhile, added $21 billion to the American economy; all are multiple drivers of GDP for a second consecutive year.

Production and prices increased last year for most U.S. mineral commodities, though nearly all metals declined, the report added. These include limestone, silica, sand and gravel, all used for industries from building to road infrastructure to plastics, glass and paper.

All told, domestic raw and recycled materials were processed by $704 billion in minerals. Among them were aluminum, brick, copper, fertilizers and steel with net mineral imports consumed by industries of $2.4 trillion in 2012. Heightened use of cement, building sand, gravel and gypsum reflected improved 2012 construction.

Minerals were also boosted by 2012’s construction rebound, with 50% output destined for the sector. Last year, mine production of 15 mineral commodities was worth more than $1 billion each in the U.S., and for first time since 2002, noted the report, the U.S. is no longer 100% reliant on rare earths imports following the resumption of operations at Mountain Pass, California.

Mining in Alaska, Arizona, California, Florida, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nevada, Texas, Utah and Wyoming constituted 64% of total output value, the study added. Nevada led production at $11.2 billion.

The USGS Mineral Resources Program delivers information on mining, minerals and their interaction with the environment; its National Minerals Information Center develops data on domestic and global supply and demand for minerals.

U.S. Mineral Production Increases for Third Straight Year

U.S. nonfuel mineral production increased for the third consecutive year in 2012, up $1.7 billion over the previous year, according to Mineral Commodity Summaries 2013, a comprehensive annual report by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The study by the USGS National Minerals Information Center is the world’s earliest available source of 2012’s mineral production statistics. With data on 90 mineral commodities key to the U.S. economy, it addresses events, trends and issues impacting the domestic and global minerals industries.

 

The report reflects unconventional realities, too, added USGS Director Marcia McNutt, wherein “geology meets economics to create the complex tapestry of variations in mineral production over time and space.” Raw value from U.S. mine output last year was $76.5 billion the report noted—a modest increase from 2011’s $74.8 billion. Net mineral raw materials and old scrap exports, meanwhile, added $21 billion to the American economy; all are multiple drivers of GDP for a second consecutive year.

 

Production and prices increased last year for most U.S. mineral commodities, though nearly all metals declined, the report added. These include limestone, silica, sand and gravel, all used for industries from building to road infrastructure to plastics, glass and paper.

 

All told, domestic raw and recycled materials were processed by $704 billion in minerals. Among them were aluminum, brick, copper, fertilizers and steel with net mineral imports consumed by industries of $2.4 trillion in 2012. Heightened use of cement, building sand, gravel and gypsum reflected improved 2012 construction.

 

Minerals were also boosted by 2012’s construction rebound, with 50% output destined for the sector. Last year, mine production of 15 mineral commodities was worth more than $1 billion each in the U.S., and for first time since 2002, noted the report, the U.S. is no longer 100% reliant on rare earths imports following the resumption of operations at Mountain Pass, California.

 

Mining in Alaska, Arizona, California, Florida, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nevada, Texas, Utah and Wyoming constituted 64% of total output value, the study added. Nevada led production at $11.2 billion.

 

The USGS Mineral Resources Program delivers information on mining, minerals and their interaction with the environment; its National Minerals Information Center develops data on domestic and global supply and demand for minerals.

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