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Mining Operations & Strategies

Since it was established in 1991, Golden West Industries has steadily built a business solving dust problems, and it’s now recognized as a leading provider of custom chemical solutions for the...

Mining Equipment Gallery

Remote Control Beam Relines Grinding Mills Safely Outotec unveiled the 7-Axis Beam Mill Reline Machines (MRMs), lifting machinery designed to replace wearable grinding mill lining systems. The MRMs fully...

New Motor Management System Brings Higher Functionality


Siemens’ Industry Automation Division has expanded its Simocode Pro motor management system to include a basic unit with Profinet interface. 

Linking up Simocode Pro via Ethernet to higher-level automation systems allows new functions to be provided for motor diagnostics, control and protection. The additional integration of PROFIenergy also improves energy management. The new Simocode Pro motor management system includes a Simocode Pro V Profinet basic unit with two RJ45 interfaces, allowing the system to connect to higher-level controllers such as Simatic S7 or to control systems such as Simatic PCS 7. Profinet can be used to provide media redundancy functions that ensure a connection is maintained within a network with ring topology, even if one communication channel fails. This helps to increase availability, with the benefit of better productivity for an entire plant. With Profinet compatibility, the new basic unit also offers more far-reaching diagnostic and control functions, in addition to simple communication between higher-level plant control and drive systems, according to the company.
www.industry.usa.siemens.com/automation

From the Editor

By Steve Fiscor, Editor-in-Chief
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This Month in Coal Mining

On February 16, President Donald J. Trump signed legislation that will repeal the Stream Protection Rule, which he called “another terrible job-killing rule.”