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Mining Operations & Strategies

Since it was established in 1991, Golden West Industries has steadily built a business solving dust problems, and it’s now recognized as a leading provider of custom chemical solutions for the...

Mining Equipment Gallery

Remote Control Beam Relines Grinding Mills Safely Outotec unveiled the 7-Axis Beam Mill Reline Machines (MRMs), lifting machinery designed to replace wearable grinding mill lining systems. The MRMs fully...

Compact Spectrometer for Field Use


Spectral Evolution says its SM-3500 full range spectrometer is designed to enhance collection and analysis of in-the-field mineral data, from early exploration/mineral identification to analysis for extraction and production.

With a full spectral range (UV/VIS/NIR) from 350-2,500 nm, users can identify mineral groups such as Al(OH), sulphates, Si(OH), Fe(OH), Mg(OH), carbonate minerals, silicates, zeolites, rare earths and massive sulphides. Unit capabilities include full range UV/VIS/NIR in one scan; very fast scanning, with autoshutter, autoexposure and auto-dark correction; compact design that weighs less than 8 lb (3.6 kg) and has no moving parts; and DARWin SP data acquisition software that produces ASCII-compatible files without post-processing for use with third-party software including SpecMIN, TSG, IOGAS and GRAMS. Other features include a USGS mineral reference library included with DARWin, capability to work with laptop or Getac PS-236 Personal Digital Assistant (PDA), available mineral contact probe and benchtop mineral reflectance probe and a wide range of field accessories, including fold-up cart for core shack use.
www.spectalevolution.com

From the Editor

By Steve Fiscor, Editor-in-Chief
More inFrom The Editor  

This Month in Coal Mining

On February 16, President Donald J. Trump signed legislation that will repeal the Stream Protection Rule, which he called “another terrible job-killing rule.”