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Mining Operations & Strategies

The bucketwheel excavators (BWEs) often used in surface mining of soft coal deposits are gigantic machines. With great size comes great punishment. BWEs must absorb a tremendous amount of impact...

Suppliers Report

For an industry that mostly measures its success in terms of the volume of rock blasted, hauled, processed into product and shipped, a growing dependency on an often-arcane tool such as software is...
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Speed and Safety: Raiseboring Provides the Solution


Dear Editor:
I read Simon Walker’s article on raiseboring (Speed and Safety: Raiseboring Provides the Solution, E&MJ April 2011, p. 32-36) with great interest. The article mentioned James Robbins, but neglected to mention my father Robert Cannon, the original designer and inventor of the Raise Boring Machine. The idea of the machine stemmed from a fire at the Homer-Wauseca mine in Michigan in 1962. Robert Cannon was calling on the mine at the time, in his capacity as mining sales manager for Dresser Industries that supplied bits for a drill at the mine. His idea was to weld a hole-opener, upside down to a drill pipe extended into the area of the fire and then ream back up, creating a hole 22 inches in diameter. This then allowed a large volume of sand to be poured on the fire to extinguish the fire.

When presented with the option of manufacturing a machine to create larger holes in underground mines,  Dresser declined and gave permission to Robert Cannon to work with another company in the development  of the machine. At the time, Doug Winberg, a childhood friend of Robert Cannon was the chief engineer of the Robbins Co.

The first machine was designed by Robert Cannon and Doug Winberg and manufactured by James Robbins. The first machine was delivered to the Homer-Wauseca mine in a little over four months from the initial design and is still working. The next six raise boring machines were purchased by the Bawden-Cannon Co., a contracting company that contracted for raise boring in mines throughout the U.S. and Canada.

Robert Cannon went on to design a number of other drilling machines including another mining staple, the down-the-hole hammer drill used for larger bore holes in underground mining.

Best regards,

Jim Cannon, International Marketing Consultants
E-mail: [email protected]

From the Editor

This month, E&MJ offers an in-depth report on Newmont Mining Corp. When gold prices started to decline, the company began to optimize operations and sell assets. Lowering operating costs allowed it to invest in operations during the downturn and now they are reaping the rewards.
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Exploration Roundup

Aston Bay Holdings has initiated at $C4 million field program at the Storm copper project on Somerset Island, Nunavut, Canada, where BHP Billiton can earn a 75% interest in the project by spending a...

This Month in Coal Mining

Contura Energy completed the previously announced acquisition of several core assets from Alpha Natural Resources (ANR), which was a key step for Alpha to emerge from Chapter 11 bankruptcy. Contura...