Mining Operations & Strategies

Railway Tunnel Design at Potash Mine Saves Time and Money Canada’s new Bethune mine — formerly known as the Legacy Project — is the first greenfield potash mine built in Saskatchewan in nearly 40...

Suppliers Report

Atlas Copco’s 6thSense Offers a Digital Path to Systems Integration According to Atlas Copco, automation and digitalization are the future of the mining industry, but automation is not just about...
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Mining Equipment Gallery

Autonomous Trucks Up Production 30% Sandvik unveiled the TH551i and TH6631i autonomous hauling trucks. When paired with the company’s AutoMine Trucking software package, the trucks can increase...

Speed and Safety: Raiseboring Provides the Solution


Dear Editor:
I read Simon Walker’s article on raiseboring (Speed and Safety: Raiseboring Provides the Solution, E&MJ April 2011, p. 32-36) with great interest. The article mentioned James Robbins, but neglected to mention my father Robert Cannon, the original designer and inventor of the Raise Boring Machine. The idea of the machine stemmed from a fire at the Homer-Wauseca mine in Michigan in 1962. Robert Cannon was calling on the mine at the time, in his capacity as mining sales manager for Dresser Industries that supplied bits for a drill at the mine. His idea was to weld a hole-opener, upside down to a drill pipe extended into the area of the fire and then ream back up, creating a hole 22 inches in diameter. This then allowed a large volume of sand to be poured on the fire to extinguish the fire.

When presented with the option of manufacturing a machine to create larger holes in underground mines,  Dresser declined and gave permission to Robert Cannon to work with another company in the development  of the machine. At the time, Doug Winberg, a childhood friend of Robert Cannon was the chief engineer of the Robbins Co.

The first machine was designed by Robert Cannon and Doug Winberg and manufactured by James Robbins. The first machine was delivered to the Homer-Wauseca mine in a little over four months from the initial design and is still working. The next six raise boring machines were purchased by the Bawden-Cannon Co., a contracting company that contracted for raise boring in mines throughout the U.S. and Canada.

Robert Cannon went on to design a number of other drilling machines including another mining staple, the down-the-hole hammer drill used for larger bore holes in underground mining.

Best regards,

Jim Cannon, International Marketing Consultants
E-mail: [email protected]

From the Editor

Price Swings and the Digital Age. Last month, we wrote and committed resources to the proposed mining charter in South Africa. In the time between E&MJ being printed, mailed and readers receiving the magazine, sanity prevailed. South Africa reversed course (See Leading Developments, p. 5) and the news story had run its cycle. A former E&MJ editor would...
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Exploration Roundup

Iamgold Continues to Hit High-grade at Monster Lake Iamgold has reported assay results from the final 14 drill holes, totaling a little more than 5,400 meters (m), from a total of 25 diamond drill...

This Month in Coal Mining

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