Mining Operations & Strategies

Blasters Realizing Value of Longer Delays Allowed by Electronics Explosives supplier BME recently called attention to an ongoing mining-industry transition from non-electric to electronic delay...

Suppliers Report

Terratec Bores Shafts for Chinese Power Project After completing several raises at copper mines located in the Yunnan and Sichuan provinces, the Terratec TR3000-R18 raise boring machine (RBM) was...
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Mining Equipment Gallery

Rock Breaker System Offers Range of Configurations Okada America Inc. released the Pedestal Rock Breaker Boom System. It is designed specifically for stationary primary crushing plants as well as...

Nuggets to Neutrinos


The discovery of gold in the Black Hills of South Dakota in 1874 by members of the Custer Expedition sparked a gold rush that helped precipitate the Great Sioux War of 1876-77. The war culminated with the Battle of the Little Bog Horn and the expropriation of the Black Hills from the Great Sioux Resrvation. The famous Homestake mine in Lead, S.D., was located in April 1876 during th infancy of the gold rush. George Hearst and other California capitalists purchased the mine in 1877. Throughout its life, the mine produced 40 million oz of gold before being closed in 2001.

All of this is revealed in a new book, Nuggets to Neutrinos: The Homestake Story, written by Steven T. Mitchell. A native and life-long resident of the Black Hills (and long-time E&MJ reader), Mitchell graduated from the South Dakato School of Mines with a BS and MS in Mining Engineering. During his mining career with the Homestake Mining Co., he held various engineering and management positions at the Homestake mine. The book was written by a miner for miners.

Much has been written about the Black Hills (Custer) Expedition of 1874, but only a few authors have described how the Black Hills were expropriated for the benefit of the U.S. and miners in particular, Mitchell explained. “Unfortunately, the entire Homestake story has not been told to date, primarily because of the longevity of the mine and the seemingly abstruse and arcane nature of much of the historical information,” Mitchell said. “Although the final chapter about Homestake’s mining history has been closed, a new chapter about science has opened.” Today the 8,000-ft deep underground mine is being transformed into a science and engineering laboratory where scientists will conduct research on dark matter, astrophysics double beta decay, and solar neutrinos—hence the name, Nuggets to Neutrinos. The 738-page hardcover book is available from Xlibris Corp.
(www.Xlibris.com)

From the Editor

Mining in the Amazon Makes Headlines As readers thumb through this edition of E&MJ, they will notice an expanded News section for Latin America. A lot happened in the region last month. The Spence expansion received approval from the Chilean government, but that was somewhat overshadowed by Brazilian President Michel Temer’s decision to clarify...
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Exploration Roundup

Osisko Drilling 400,000 m at Windfall Lake Osisko Mining has reported numerous favorable results from an ongoing, 400,000-meter (m) drill program at its Windfall Lake gold project in Urban Township,...

This Month in Coal Mining

Cloud Peak Hosts EPA Administrator Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt visited the Cloud Peak Energy’s headquarters in Broomfield, Colorado, last month to discuss the...